Health Information Professionals Week Promotes ‘Accurate Information, Quality Care’ During 27th Annual Celebration

HIP Week April 3-9, 2016

Meet Romi Wang. As The Health Collaborative’s Senior Data Analyst, she finds stories in health data.

“Providing evidence to show what works in healthcare, what does not, and where the gaps are, is so important,” she says. “Accurate, timely health data can influence mindsets and decisions, and has the potential to help breakdown silos and promote data-driven decision-making.”

Romi said it best, and with good timing.
This week, The Health Collaborative celebrates health information professionals during the 27th annual Health Information Professionals (HIP) Week April 3-9, 2016. Established by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), this year’s theme is “Accurate Information, Quality Care.”

“Our team of health information technology professionals facilitates data exchange to providers and care teams in our region so that both providers and patients have access to health information they can trust,” said Jason Buckner, SVP, Informatics at The Health Collaborative.

“Health information is quietly advancing healthcare”

 – Tim Polsinelli, Director, Informatics

That element of trust is proving to be key – the secure transfer of health information to the right place, at the right time is becoming an increasing component of achieving the triple aim: better care, healthier people, and smarter spending. Moreover, advancing population health depends on the ability to turn data into actionable knowledge.

“Health information is quietly advancing healthcare,” says Tim Polsinelli, Director, Informatics, The Health Collaborative. “Specifically, Health Information Technology improves the quality of healthcare delivery, increases patient safety, decreases medical errors, and strengthens the interaction between patients and healthcare providers.”

In all our Health Information Exchange (HIE) technology and professional services, from Encounter Notification System (ENS) to utilization reports, The Health Collaborative recognizes that accurate and timely health information is quality healthcare’s greatest asset. And our greatest asset? The people who ensure that information is accurate and timely.

We’d like to introduce you to some of our health information professionals, and how their roles improve quality care and ultimately, health outcomes. 
Burwinkel2
KMeadors
Taylor, Julia
Romi Wang

Adam Burwinkel 

Meet Adam: Network Administrator. When he’s not improving connectivity between health systems, he’s likely playing with his 1-year old son, Bobby, watching Archer, or cycling.

What does he like most about what he does?
“Talking to veterans in the IT field at various health systems, gaining the knowledge they’ve developed.”

Judy Bradford
As a Health Systems & Integration Analyst, Judy has been instrumental in developing THC’s ENS technology. Likes include exercising, crafting, and Game of Thrones. Dislikes include rudeness and poor data quality.

What does she like most about her job?
“I like the fact that I work for a purpose.”

Chris Horn

Meet Chris! Likes watching the Big Bang Theory; dislikes Mondays. Hint: If you can’t find him providing stable infrastructure to facilitate THC’s patient-centered technologies, he’s likely fishing from his bass boat.

Star Wars or Star Trek, Chris?
“Duh, Star Wars.” (Our bad, Chris!)

Kathy Meadors

As Director of Customer Services, Kathy enjoys learning new things to solve problems for customers. Likes include vacation, family, and Thai food. Dislikes: Winter & cold weather.

What’s a big challenge for HIT?
“Technology differences and interfacing them, competing companies and a achieving collaboration between them to benefit the patient.”

Tim Polsinelli

Tim likes Michigan and software development; dislikes HL7 and long walks on the beach. When Tim isn’t solving complex problems as Director, Informatics, he enjoys Mexican cuisine while listening to Justin Bieber and catching up on the reruns of Gilmore Girls.

What’s your hobby, Tim?
“Breaking things, so they can be fixed.”

Julia Taylor

Meet Julia, Project Manager. Likes include the complex work of health information and the passionate people in the field; dislikes include the lack of time to “do it all.” When she’s not managing THC’s strategic projects, you can find her at one of her three kids’ volleyball, football, swimming, basketball, lacrosse or baseball events.

How do you see your work improving health outcomes?
“By privately or publicly reporting out claims and clinical measures, my hope is the data is informative, valuable and actionable which in turn helps improve the overall healthcare, and health, in our community.”

Romi Wang
As a Senior Data Analyst, she finds stories in data. As a mom of two teenage boys, she finds stories in their adventures & travels together. Likes include breaking silos and data-driven decision-making, dislikes include…

Wait, what do you dislike, Romi?
“Nothing. Life is beautiful and work is great. I feel fortunate to be able to do the things I love everyday with colleagues that I respect.”

Mike Wells

When Mike’s not protecting data as Information Security Officer, he’s reading about it. (Seriously, if there’s a white paper on cool security tech, he’s read it). Dislikes include bad guys; Likes include spy novels and HGTV’s Island Life.

What are the biggest challenges in HIT, Mike?
“Agreeing on and actually supporting uniform standards for data representation. Until we are all speaking the same language, interoperability will be hit and miss resulting in incomplete data with clinicians unable to provide the best possible care for their patients.”

For more information on AHIMA’s role in the development and advancement of health information professionals worldwide, visit ahima.org.

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