UC Health Hosts TAP MD Class for “Trauma 101” [PHOTOS]

TAP MD visited UC Health on Friday, August 16 for a learning session on “Trauma 101.” Students learned about various aspects of trauma and emergent care. A special shout out to our event coordinator, Susan Hatfield, MSN, MeD, RN-BC, Clinical Program Developer for the Center for Professional Growth and Innovative Practice at the UC Medical Center. There were three parts to the four-hour day:

Aircare: Students learned about the benefits of having a Level One Hospital AirCare team in our region, including why and how helicopters are called, what careers are needed on the helicopters, getting to see the helipad, and more! Thank you to our AirCare host, Sharon Walsh-Hart.

CSTARS: We got to learn all about the CSTARS program and everything the United States does to send its best to take care of our wounded warriors. Cincinnati has one of only three programs in the world! Many thanks to all of the CSTARS presenters.

Trauma Surgeon: Students heard from renowned trauma surgeon Dr. Christina Williams about what it’s like to work in a Level One Hospital, including many of the things she has seen throughout her career. She also spoke about her many adventures traveling with Doctors without Borders for the last few years. We appreciate you, Dr. Williams.

 

Follow UC Health on social media:

https://www.facebook.com/aircareandmobilecare/
https://www.facebook.com/UCHealthCincinnati/
https://twitter.com/uc_health
https://www.linkedin.com/in/uchealthnews/
https://www.linkedin.com/company/uc-health/

 

Learn more about TAP MD and the TAP Health program at http://taphealth.healthcollab.org.

 
See below for a photo gallery of the TAP MD students’ experiences at UC Health:

Operation Cincinnati S.M.A.R.T. Graduates Fourth Class of Military Trainees [PHOTOS]

On August 16th The Health Collaborative (THC) hosted the fourth graduation ceremony for Operation Cincinnati S.M.A.R.T. (Strategic Medical Assets Readiness Training). 30 Active, Reserve, and Guard personnel representing the U.S. Army graduated from the unique training program.

S.M.A.R.T. is an innovative, strategic partnership between the U.S. military and regional healthcare systems designed to prevent skill atrophy and build civilian/military relationships while strengthening community ties. The program began in August of 2018.

Four THC member hospitals: The Christ Hospital Health Network, Mercy Health, TriHealth, and UC Health provide specialized training to S.M.A.R.T. participants. Experiential learning opportunities include accompanying paramedics on ambulance calls, working alongside emergency department personnel, and shadowing specialties such as radiology, laboratory technology, dental treatment, mental health, and others.

The Operation Cincinnati S.M.A.R.T. graduation ceremony featured a special keynote address from Col. Brad Wenstrup in addition to soldier testimonials and a panel discussion from hospital representative veterans that shared stories on transitioning from military to civilian life.

A special thank you to the continued collaboration and commitment from The Christ Hospital Health Network, Mercy Health, TriHealth, and UC Health to our soldiers.

The next round of Operation Cincinnati S.M.A.R.T. participants will report in November 2019. See below for a photo gallery of the August 16 graduation ceremony at The Health Collaborative. 

Vivek Alamuri: TAP MD Experience at The HealthCare Connections

 

VIVEK ALAMURI, A JUNIOR AT INDIAN HILL HIGH SCHOOL, IS OUR STUDENT “REPORTER” IN THE TAP MD PROGRAM.

TAP MD and TAP HC are programs designed to help high school students “tap” into their potential to fulfill a career as a physician or in the healthcare field. Students will experience events that provide information on types of medical specialties, how to apply for medical school and what different healthcare paths are available – from IT to home health – to physical therapy.

Click here to learn more about our TAP HEALTH initiative. Click here to read Vivek’s takeaways from a recent TAP MD experience at Mercy Health Anderson Hospital.

On June 25, we visited The HealthCare Connections Inc. at Lincoln Heights Health Center in Evendale, an organization dedicated to making healthcare accessible to underprivileged communities. The CEO and founder of this group, Mrs. Dolores Lindsay, spent time with us to talk about how she started this initiative and kept persevering for decades to make this project successful. The Directors of the various departments of the treatment (medical, dental etc.) all came down as well to speak to us.

I particularly enjoyed the segment about diabetes and obesity where we talked about how different Type 1 and Type 2 are. Type 1 is a genetic disorder where insulin, a key protein that regulates blood sugar by having cells uptake sugars from the bloodstream, does not have its intended effect because the cells do not have the receptor for insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is dependent on exercise, eating habits and other lifestyle factors where the body is unable to produce insulin. I found this particularly insightful because people tend to confuse the two together and misunderstand the science between them; they explicitly mentioned that these two are completely different in terms of causation and clarified the differences.

We also did a short activity with sugar cubes in efforts to help us visualize how much sugar is in different foods. We all ended up in shock when we realized the crazy amounts of sugar in Coke, Mountain Dew, French fries and even ketchup! There was enough sugar in the Mountain Dew for a handful! I loved that activity for sure.

Next, we discussed the strategy for community health centers to improve well-being in their patients. To do this, we need to address the problem from a holistic perspective in which the patient is the focus of all efforts. For example, a patient can’t prevent hypothermia if their home isn’t properly insulated or take their medications on time if they’re working two jobs and collapse after getting home. The problem needs to be addressed from different fronts, which is where the team comes in: administrators, social workers, nurses and so many other roles to account for areas that cannot be dealt with in the hospital.

Another component of this strategy is to increase preventative medicine by increasing awareness, promoting regular checkups and follow-up appointments. If pre-diabetes can be prevented from turning into diabetes with proper care, then it saves everyone a whole lot of time, money and energy.

Lastly, the presentation took a different turn, in which we were introduced into an unfamiliar side of healthcare that is often overlooked – Health IT. As the modern age progresses, we use more and more software, processing and administration to keep the herculean efforts of treating such communities in an effective way, all of which requires admin and technology professionals. So, if med school isn’t for you, there’s still lots of time to go into a different major, but still help these underprivileged communities through healthcare.

All in all, I think this was a very important event for the TAP MD program because it focused on serving the community and why it is so very important, and I certainly enjoyed it!

~ Vivek Alamuri, IHHS

Vivek Alamuri: TAP MD Visit to Mercy Health Anderson Hospital

Vivek Alamuri, a junior at Indian Hill High School, is a participant in our TAP MD program!

 

TAP MD and TAP HC are programs designed to help high school students “tap” into their potential to fulfill a career as a physician or in the healthcare field. Students will experience events that provide information on types of medical specialties, how to apply for medical school and what different healthcare paths are available – from IT to home health – to physical therapy.

Click here to learn more about our TAP HEALTH initiative. Click here for Vivek’s first experience with TAP MD.  

 

 

Last week we visited the Anderson Hospital by Mercy Health, and I have to say that the interior design of the hospital just blew me away as I stepped in. It was really neat and pretty! We got our TAP MD lab coats that day and they look very nice.

So what we learned that day was basic suturing and a little about how emergency medicine works. The suturing part was first, and it was really fun, but definitely harder than it looks. We got a banana, scissors, a tweezer and a scissor-like tool another to hold & help tie the knots, and of course a needle. The needle is U-shaped to allow for a smooth insertion and removal. I stuck it in the banana, and then twisted my wrist 90 degrees to get the needle through the “cut” on the banana. Now came the hard part, I had to hold the tiny needle with scissor like tool, the string with the tweezers and make a knot. It was hard and it certainly takes a lot of practice – I think if I did it for a week straight, I’d be able to get it. I feel like this was a good exposure to this field of medicine that I might be interested in.

The emergency medicine part of the day was no less exciting! We walked to the helipad and learned about the logistics of air transport in emergencies. It was my first time at a helipad, and it was quite different than what I had imagined – they only send out choppers for extremely time sensitive cases – like heart attacks or strokes because there are only 90 minutes before they can be saved. On top of that, weather conditions and other clearances must be given, so it’s not as common as we might think, like when helicopters land in the middle of the street.

After that, we went inside the building again to an Emergency room – this one is very special because it has negative air flow. Normally, air comes into the building and flows around, but here, air is sucked up and flushed out into the air. This system is very expensive, but worth it when it comes to dealing with deadly airborne diseases so other patients don’t get it and it is diluted by the air.

We were also told of a case during the Ebola crisis where a patient was suspected of having Ebola – this could have been deadly. They were ready to close down the building and evacuate all the other patients to different hospitals and was a high-tension situation! Once it was found that it was malaria, they were able to treat it, but thankfully it wasn’t worse!

In conclusion, I just thought that this was an awesome and fun event, and I learned important aspects of healthcare that I hadn’t considered so am looking forward to the next one!

Suture Lab Experience for TAP MD Students in April

By Emily Yu, Mason High School Junior
TAP MD Class of 2019

TAP MD recently went to the Mercy Health Hospital in Anderson for one of its monthly on-site experiences in healthcare. For the first time, we were able to wear our own lab coats like doctors. Just wearing our lab coats felt like we were one step closer to being a doctor, which being participants in TAP MD helps us do!

We were first introduced to people who work in sports medicine, some of whom work with high school athletes. We were also introduced to Dr. Steve Feagins who has done sports medicine with college and professional teams.

The TAP MD split into two groups: one group went with Dr. Feagins to the Emergency Room and the other stayed and learned about suturing. I stayed with the latter. Since we can’t operate on animal tissue, we sutured bananas. The sports medical professionals walked us through what suturing is and how to suture. At first, I thought this would be quite easy since it looks like sewing, which I can do.

Unfortunately, I would say it took me a little longer than everyone else to understand. We first made a wound on a banana with a forceps. Forceps are instruments that look like a pair of scissors used for grasping and holding objects. Then using the forceps we curved a suture needle so that it poked up on the other side of the wound. The needle was small and hooked and had a string attached to the end. Then using tweezers and forceps, I had to tie two knots in opposite directions. It took me a lot of time even with their help to tie my first knot. It felt like a huge accomplishment for me even though I learned that it takes physicians only seconds to do on squirming patients.

We then rotated with the other group to go to the emergency department with Dr. Feagins. We went to the helipad where he explained the cases in which the hospital uses a helicopter or when patients from other hospitals fly in. It was very informative to hear since I’ve never really heard someone talk about how hospitals use helicopters.

We then visited a trauma room. He explained the functions of certain parts of the room. Something you might not think about,  air flow, is very important. Air gets ventilated out in case there are airborne diseases, which you would not want circulating to other parts of the hospital. Dr. Feagins was very informative and answered questions about aspects of his job, and offered advice for us if we decided to pursue medicine.

Although it was shorter, I really enjoyed being able to learn hands-on how to suture. I also enjoyed being at our first experience inside a hospital. This experience definitely got me to look into sports medicine as a possible avenue and gave us a look into a possible career.

Stay tuned for more TAP Health stories from the students’ point of view!

For more information on TAP Health programs and events, visit http://taphealth.healthcollab.org or contact Heleena McKinney, Manager Healthcare Workforce Innovation: hmckinney@healthcollab.org.  

TAP Health Leadership Represented on Regional Workforce Panel

The Health Professions Network (HPN) is in Cincinnati this week for its annual conference. HPN is a nationwide collaborative group of organizations representing leading health professions associations, accrediting agencies, and educational institutions, as well as federal & state workforce analysts and licensing & certification bodies. They represent the industry’s non-physician workforce needs and generate an annual State of the Industry Report on health and healthcare jobs. This spring they chose Cincinnati to hold one of two annual meetings with a theme of Industry Impact on Healthcare and Healthcare Staffing.

Heleena McKinney, Manager, Healthcare Workforce InnovationThe Health Collaborative’s (THC) Heleena McKinney, Manager of Healthcare Workforce Innovation, will attend as well as participate in a panel on Friday, April 5 at Kingsgate Marriot (11:30am-12:30pm). This panel is designed for regional experts to share efforts with HPN.

Panel Discussion: “Collaborating to Build Our Regional Workforce”

  • Hope Arthur, Director, Health Careers Collaborative
  • Sue Kathman, Executive Director, Mercy Neighborhood Ministries
  • Heleena McKinney, Manager, Healthcare Workforce Innovation, The Health Collaborative
  • William Lecher, Assistant VP, Division of Patient Services, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

McKinney leads TAP Health, THC’s program series engineered to build the regional healthcare workforce pipeline by “tapping” into the talent of the next generation of healthcare professionals. Area high school students are exposed to a wide variety of physician specialties and other healthcare careers at monthly events and annual healthcare career fairs.

To learn more about TAP Health programs and opportunities to get involved, please visit http://taphealth.healthcollab.org or contact Heleena McKinney at hmckinney@healthcollab.org.

HealthFORCE Quick Stats: Spring 2018

Our signature healthcare workforce pipeline event, known as HealthFORCE, is held in the spring and fall of each year to allow area high school students to explore a wide variety of health and healthcare careers. We invite schools from across the region to join our exhibitors and panelists for a half-day experience that exposes students to careers ranging from clinical to pharmacy to home care.

Check out these stats on our successful Spring event, and reach out to Heleena McKinney, Manager of Healthcare Workforce Innovation, to learn more about our workforce initiatives and TAP Health pipeline programming!

First Tap HC Class Visits Brookwood Retirement Community

Last week marked the inaugural kickoff of one of our newest and most exciting Healthcare Workforce Innovation initiatives known as Tap HC. Expanding upon the already-successful Tap MD program allowing area high school students who are interested in physician careers to “tap” into their potential, Tap HC takes it a step further to give students an opportunity to explore a wide variety of careers in health and healthcare.

Tap HC and Tap MD students commit to a one-year program involving monthly experiences at a variety of health and healthcare delivery sites throughout the Tristate area. Students are expected and encouraged to attend each month due to the unique nature of every experience, with the understanding that academics and pre-planned commitments should take priority. At each monthly event, they are able to talk with professionals in their field(s) of interest, ask questions, handle equipment and instruments relevant to the job, and even view certain medical procedures as appropriate.

The first-ever Tap HC class of 21 students – representing 17 schools across the region – met at Brookwood Retirement Community in Blue Ash, where they not only received orientation guidance but managed to lose to the residents in a spirited game of chair volleyball (final score 13-6). Congratulations to the 2018 Tap HC class, Heleena McKinney, Manager of the Healthcare Workforce Innovation initiative at The Health Collaborative, and her team for a fun and successful kickoff event. As Heleena shared,

“We were there [at Brookwood] to learn about a variety of professions, but we got even more than we planned for. We learned about long term care in general, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, HR, Nursing Home Administration, Nursing, Activities/Rec Therapy, and social work – all from people in those professions. The chair volleyball was the highlight but the whole day was amazing and the kids were beaming from ear to ear.”


 

HealthFORCE Takes it to the Next Level

HealthFORCE logo Looking for more information on healthcare careers for high school students? On April 12, 2018, regional high schools are invited to bring their sophomore, junior, and senior students for an opportunity to discover and explore the broad spectrum of health and healthcare careers available across the Tristate region – at the HealthFORCE career expo! Click here to view the event flyer and pick the session that works best for you and your students. For information about Healthcare Workforce Innovation pipeline efforts of The Health Collaborative, please visit http://taphealth.healthcollab.org  or contact Heleena McKinney at hmckinney@healthcollab.org.

Tap HC Program Kicks Off with 21 Area High School Students

Tap-HC-kickoff-group

Last week marked the inaugural kickoff of one of our newest and most exciting Healthcare Workforce Innovation initiatives, known as Tap HC.

The group of 21 sophomores, juniors, and seniors representing 17 schools from across the region met at Brookwood Retirement Community in Blue Ash for their inaugural meeting. Scroll down to view the 2018 roster.

Expanding upon the already-successful Tap MD program allowing area high school students who are interested in physician careers to “tap” into their potential, Tap HC takes it a step further to give students an opportunity to explore a wide variety of careers in health and healthcare.

Tap HC and Tap MD students commit to a one-year program involving monthly experiences at a variety of health and healthcare delivery sites throughout the Tristate area. Students are expected and encouraged to attend each month due to the unique nature of every experience, with the understanding that academics and pre-planned commitments should take priority. At each monthly event, they are able to talk with professionals in their field(s) of interest, ask questions, handle equipment and instruments relevant to the job, and even view certain medical procedures as appropriate.

For more information about Healthcare Workforce Innovation pipeline efforts of The Health Collaborative, please visit http://taphealth.healthcollab.org or contact Heleena McKinney at hmckinney@healthcollab.org.

TAP-HC-roster-2018

Tap MD Program Sees Largest Class Ever in 2018

With 51 students representing 30 high schools across the region, the 2018 class of Tap MD – The Health Collaborative’s physician pipeline program for area high school students – is the largest ever for the program, now in its seventh year. 

Scroll down to view the roster for 2018. The Tap MD program began in 2011 under the umbrella of the Greater Cincinnati Health Council which has now merged with The Health Collaborative. The mission of Tap MD is to seek and find “untapped” talented high school students to increase the number of future Tristate urban and rural physicians. Any high school junior or senior at least 16 years of age can be “tapped” by a school teacher or counselor.

Participating students must be strong academically, motivated, mature, and dependable. Moreover, students should have a positive attitude! Tap MD students are particularly targeted because they have not yet decided upon a career choice; however, we want students who have true potential and motivation to one day enter medical school. Standardized test scores, grades, and extracurricular involvement are among the factors considered by the selection committee when identifying students for the program.

Students commit to the program for one year, attending monthly experiences at a variety of health and healthcare delivery sites throughout the Tristate area. They are expected and encouraged to attend each month due to the unique nature of every experience, with the understanding that academics and pre-planned commitments should take priority. At each monthly event, they are able to talk with professionals in their field(s) of interest, ask questions, handle equipment and instruments relevant to the job, and even view certain medical procedures as appropriate.

Congratulations to Heleena McKinney, Manager of Healthcare Workforce Innovation, for the program’s huge success! For more information, she can be reached at hmckinney@healthcollab.org or visit http://taphealth.healthcollab.org.

TAP-MD-roster-2018